Cold fusion reactor test 0.2 – Normal test

Cold fusion reactor test 0.2 – Normal test
Video Rating: 0 / 5

Google Tech Talks November 9, 2006 ABSTRACT This is not your father’s fusion reactor! Forget everything you know about conventional thinking on nuclear fusion: high-temperature plasmas, steam turbines, neutron radiation and even nuclear waste are a thing of the past. Goodbye thermonuclear fusion; hello inertial electrostatic confinement fusion (IEC), an old idea that’s been made new. While the international community debates the fate of the politically-turmoiled billion ITER (an experimental thermonuclear reactor), simple IEC reactors are being built as high-school science fair projects. Dr. Robert Bussard, former Asst. Director of the Atomic Energy Commission and founder of Energy Matter Conversion Corporation (EMC2), has spent 17 years perfecting IEC, a fusion process that converts hydrogen and boron directly into electricity producing helium as the only waste product. Most of this work was funded by the Department of Defense, the details of which have been under seal… until now. Dr. Bussard will discuss his recent results and details of this potentially world-altering technology, whose conception dates back as far as 1924, and even includes a reactor design by Philo T. Farnsworth (inventor of the scanning television). Can a 100 MW fusion reactor be built for less than Google’s annual electricity bill? Come see what’s possible when you think outside the thermonuclear box and ignore the herd. Google engEDU Speaker: Dr. Robert Bussard
Video Rating: 4 / 5

10000th cycle of the Annular Core Research Reactor

With a muffled “pop,” a flash of blue light and a few ripples through 14000 gallons of deionized water, Sandia National Laboratories’ Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) recently conducted its 10000th operation. During a maximum pulse, the ACRR generates a whopping 35000 megawatts of power for seven milliseconds. Read more at share.sandia.gov SAND 2011-7841P
Video Rating: 4 / 5

Tepco announced Wednesday that, according to the Times, “There is the possibility that criticality, a sustained nuclear chain reaction, had occurred ‘temporarily’ and ‘locally’ in the No. 2 reactor.” During it’s testing, Tepco has detected xenon-133 and -135, “Products of uranium or plutonium fission.” enenews.com Big Siberian Freeze to Hit Britain www.sott.net NASA detects X 2-class flare eruption on the Sun theextinctionprotocol.wordpress.com On Tuesday, November 8th, Asteroid 2005 YU55 will pass within 0.85 lunar units of the Earth geology.com El Hierro Update : Harmonic Tremors Increase On All Islands! : It’s Going to Blow : November 4, 2011 www.youtube.com NASA: Asteroid 2005 YU55 Q & A – Nov. 1, 2011 (Ustream) www.youtube.com
Video Rating: 4 / 5

US Freezes All Nuclear Reactor Construction Operating Licenses!!! YES!!! (MsMilkytheclown)

Source video by MsMilky: www.youtube.com : “I wouldn’t have believed it was possible, but check this out! Link to NRC document here to read in full: www.nrc.gov US Freezes All Nuclear Reactor Construction & Operating Licenses Title: US Freezes All Nuclear Power Plant Licensing Decisions Source: ENS Date: August 7, 2012 Federal nuclear regulators today froze at least 19 final reactor licensing decisions in response to a ruling by the US Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit that spent nuclear fuel stored on-site at nuclear power plants “poses a dangerous, long-term health and environmental risk.” In its ruling, the appeals court invalidated the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s 2010 updates to the Waste Confidence Rule and also the Temporary Storage Rule and directed the commission to fully comply with federal law. In response, the NRC today put a hold on nine construction and operating licenses, eight license renewals, one operating license, and one early site permit. The court noted that, after decades of failure to site a permanent geologic repository, including 20 years of working on the now-abandoned Yucca Mountain repository in Nevada, the NRC “has no long-term plan other than hoping for a geologic repository.” Therefore, it is possible that spent fuel will be stored at reactor sites “on a permanent basis,” the court said. […] “In recognition of our duties under the law, we will not issue licenses dependent upon the Waste Confidence Decision or the Temporary Storage

the title says it all – here’s the gamma spectrum of chernobyl’s spent fuel. :-) how i found that little jewel? see here: www.youtube.com full size pictures of the HPGe gamma spectrum: flic.kr flic.kr flic.kr flic.kr software used for spectroscopy: – pulse recorder and analyzer (PRA): www.physics.usyd.edu.au – fitzpeaks: www.jimfitz.demon.co.uk
Video Rating: 4 / 5

Japan closes last reactor, ‘energy crisis looms’

Japan is set to turn off its last working reactor this weekend, leaving one of the world’s largest industrial nations without a source of nuclear energy for the first time in almost 50 years. The government has bowed to public pressure following last year’s disaster at the Fukushima power plant after the catastrophic earthquake and tsunami. For more on the impact of the shut-down, RT talks to James Corbett, editor of The Corbett Report. RT on Twitter twitter.com RT on Facebook www.facebook.com
Video Rating: 4 / 5

Nuclear Reactor

Check us out at www.tutorvista.com A nuclear reactor is a device to initiate, control, and sustain a nuclear chain reaction. The most common use of nuclear reactors is for the generation of electrical power (see Nuclear power) and for the power in some ships (see Nuclear marine propulsion). This is usually accomplished by methods that involve using heat from the nuclear reaction to power steam turbines. There are also other less common uses as discussed below. Most nuclear reactors use a chain reaction to induce a controlled rate of nuclear fission in fissile material, releasing both energy and free neutrons. A reactor consists of an assembly of nuclear fuel (a reactor core), usually surrounded by a neutron moderator such as regular water, heavy water, graphite, or zirconium hydride, and fitted with mechanisms such as control rods that control the rate of the reaction. Nuclear reactor physics is the branch of science that deals with the study and application of chain reaction to induce controlled rate of fission for energy in reactors. The physics of nuclear fission has several quirks that affect the design and behavior of nuclear reactors. This article presents a general overview of the physics of nuclear reactors and their behavior.

Dr. Jacopo Buongiorno of MIT’s Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering talks to Adam about nuclear fission. Using MIT’s nuclear reactor, Buongiorno and his research group investigate methods for improving the output and safety of these highly productive energy generators. While controversy still surrounds the use of nuclear reactors as powerplants — due in large part to widely publicized accidents at Chernobyl (Ukraine) and Three Mile Island (US) — nuclear energy provides an answer to humankind’s rapidly growing energy needs. As Buongiorno explains, nuclear fission has other applications outside of energy generation, such as microscopic scanning and understanding of small molecules. Join Adam as he learns how nuclear fission works, as well as the safety measures that allow nuclear accidents to be quickly contained. [05:42]
Video Rating: 5 / 5

Mousetrap reactor (side view slow motion)

a physics experiment where it simulates nuclear fission. 100 mousetraps with 100 balls are set off in an enclosed area by one ball.
Video Rating: 4 / 5

UM Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences Department faculty held a forum for students on the Japanese nuclear situation on March 18. This forum was moderated by Professor Ron Gilgenbach and included a panel of experts on nuclear fission reactors, nuclear reactor safety, radiation dosimetry and human effects of radiation: Professor John Lee, Professor Thomas Downar, Professor William Martin, Professor Kimberly Kearfott and Professor (designate) Annalisa Manera. The following video records this forum. It should be kept in mind that the understanding of this situation has evolved as events unfold in Japan.
Video Rating: 4 / 5

Xenon found in reactor 2 indicative of possible fission

Part 1 from www3.nhk.or.jp The operator of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant has poured water containing boric acid into the No. 2 reactor. The move followed the detection of a radioactive substance, xenon, in the reactor’s containment vessel, indicating that nuclear fission may have resumed. Tokyo Electric Power Company poured boric acid solution into the No. 2 reactor for one hour from shortly before 3 AM on Wednesday. Last Friday, TEPCO began operating equipment to remove radioactive substances from the No. 2 reactor. The device sucks out gas from the containment vessel and filters out radioactive materials. The company has been analyzing the types of radioactive substances and their density near the outlet of the device. On Tuesday, TEPCO detected xenon-133 and xenon-135, substances that are produced during the nuclear fission of uranium-235. The company says the possibility of nuclear fission inside the reactor cannot be excluded. TEPCO says even if nuclear fission has resumed, it should be on a small scale as there have been no major changes in the temperature or pressure of the reactor, or radiation levels at monitoring posts around the compound. The government’s Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency says it is unlikely that nuclear fuel has begun melting again as the density of the xenon is low and there has been no change in the reactor temperatures. The agency says it will continue to monitor the xenon in the reactor. Wednesday, November 02, 2011 07:27 +0900
Video Rating: 5 / 5

The nuclear an environmental poising of the earth is the most catastrophic thing to happen in Humanity’s long history
Video Rating: 4 / 5

Zero Power Reactor simulation

Ever wanted to see a nuclear reactor core in action? Here’s a detailed simulation of the Zero Power Reactor experiment, run by Argonne’s unique “UNIC” code. Here, we use VisIt to visualize a numerical model of the ZPR-6 Assembly 6a experiment simulated using the Argonne UNIC code. 0:00-0:06: The fuel and other plates are dropped into an example drawer, and the drawer is inserted into the matrix tube. 0:06-0:21: The two matrix halves are brought together to make a critical (self-sustaining) assembly. 0:21-0:35: The fission power is revealed to be centralized in the thin, enriched Uranium plates. 0:35-0:53: Returning to our example drawer, we show the detailed local plate powers and their relation to the drawer composition. 0:53-1:11: Our model shows that each plate can have widely-varying local changes in the space and energy neutron densities. Read more at www.anl.gov