What is NanoCrystal Electricity and how does Nano Crystal Electricity work?

What is NanoCrystal Electricity

The new technology of NanoCrystal Electricity. What is it and what does it mean?

This Tesla dream device will power everything and make all of your power cords obsolete. “It’s about to change your life” – Stephen Hawking.

 

Here’s a 100 year old, early prototype of a device which was designed to emit electricity through the air.

 

The FCC just gave a modern version of this device the green light so perhaps, and maybe sooner than we think, this new technology will be everywhere.

This technology has been in development for over a century starting with it’s revolutionary inventor Nikola Tesla.

According to teletechnical.com

It is really just a repackaging of an old principle. Tesla did experiments with this long ago, which despite his accomplishments, showed a lack of understanding of power distribution… The additional thing that is not advertised in these designs is the power loss. The transmitter sends the power out in all directions, but only part of it is recovered by the receiving device.

 

Michael Daniel, a top writer for Quora says:

We have known for a very long time that certain crystals, when stressed, create voltages on their surfaces. This is known as the Piezoelectric effect. The most common application was in the earliest electronic pick-up cartridges on turntables. Compared to the competing technologies of moving-magnet, or moving-coil*, it gave the strongest signal requiring the least effort to amplify.
* Moving-coil gives the least output, but a more faithful rendering of the information in the groove.

These days, such crystals are generally used to create a brief spark to light a gas stove or cigarette lighter.

The idea of inducing a fixed oscillation into such crystals on both small and large scales has been forwarded many times before. Therefore, I am not

surprised that “nano-tech” is promising a future of many tiny crystals arranged like PV crystals so that the charge from each nano-crystal can be accumulated on a greater scale.

Such a Piezo “Panel” could create a significant output that wouldn’t just be a joke, and acoustically tuned panels could be placed in noisy environments (like heavy traffic) with their resultant output being fed back into the grid, but would they deliver a suitable return on investment (ROI)? Probably not.


From what I can read on this topic, my immediate interpretation is completely off-the-mark. The apparent intent is to excite such crystals using RF. By setting up giant transmitters, you should be able to have an RF receiver panel in your portable device in order to use it anywhere without batteries or wires.

  1. From a commercial perspective, this is never going to work. Tesla’s Wardenclyffe Tower was axed by JP Morgan because there was no way to meter people’s usage and charge them accordingly.
  2. The fall-off in power strength is a function of the inverse-square of the distance from the tower. Double the distance, and 1/4 of the power is available. This means we would have to be saturated in towers more closely aggregated than traditional power line poles.
  3. Just how carefully has the RF band been chosen? At the power level required to be useful, we could be microwaving every living thing on the planet.

Tacking “nano~” on to the front just creates a new buzz word. I would like to say it’s “hype”, but if hyperbole were actually capable of powering anything, it would have been harnessed decades ago.

Wikipedia has an interesting article about Wireless Power Transfer

Could nanocrystals be the next fuel source, powering everything from your watch to your home to your car?

Scholarly articles about Nanocrystal Technology